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Week 2 begins Monday 19 August 2019

The information below is intended to answer any questions you may have about the Waihi street changes. If you read through them all and still want something clarified please:

 


28 March 2017

One Year On

28 March 2017 

What has been achieved by the changes?

Emergency services have told us they can find properties much more easily since the changes came into effect.

NZ Post has also told us they can find properties much more easily since the changes came into effect.

Why is my old address still on Google Maps?

The company has a process for changing street numbers and addresses. At the time of the street changes we had no reason to suspect it would cause us any headaches.

In reality, more than a year has passed and despite numerous attempts from us, the information has not yet been updated.

As Google Maps is one of the most commonly used electronic mapping systems today, this has caused problems for many residents, particularly in relation to courier deliveries and telecommunications connections.

When will Google Maps be updated?

We’re continuing to work on the Google Maps problem but have no control over the company’s internal processes, so have not yet made any noticeable progress. What we think will probably happen is that we’ll all wake up one morning and discover the addresses have been magically updated.

Where can I find the correct Waihi street names and numbers?

For the correct Waihi street names and numbers go to our online mapping system at www.hauraki-dc.govt.nz/online-maps

What is HDC doing to fix the problem?

Emergency services don’t use Google Maps. They have their own mapping systems which include the correct Waihi street names and numbers.

We’ve advised all the main courier companies that Google Maps is inaccurate when it comes to Waihi, and asked them to refer to our online mapping system. We also provided all the local couriers with paper maps of the changes.

We’ve advised all the main power and telecommunications companies that Google Maps is inaccurate, and they’ve assured us they are using either LINZ based data, or our online mapping system (although we know the experience of some residents would suggest otherwise).

We’ve double-checked to ensure LINZ and other government organisations have the correct information.

What can I do to help fix the problem?

Until this is resolved, we need to encourage people to use our online maps rather than Google Maps when locating property in Waihi.

Please pass the link below on to friends, family, visitors and any companies you regularly deal with www.hauraki-dc.govt.nz/online-maps

Who do I call if I’m having ongoing issues with courier deliveries or service connections?

We’re happy to contact companies on behalf of residents if needed.

To notify us of ongoing issues please call 0800 734 834 or email us at info@hauraki-dc.govt.nz


March 2016

The information below is intended to answer any questions you may have about the Waihi street changes. If you read through them all and still want something clarified please:

 

Why are the names and numbers being changed – they’ve been fine up to now?

How many people/properties are affected?

What are some of the problems or concerns that have been raised?

Where can I find the full list of changes?

What date is the change to take place from?

When can I use my new address?

What do these changes mean for the legal definition of my property and who will pay to have the legal definitions changed with my lawyer?

Why does Waihi have to follow the New Zealand standards?

Why didn’t the Council act on this sooner?

How am I going to let everyone know about my new address?

Why did the Council choose only to do some of the changes?

What process did the Council follow to get to its decision?

How can I find out more?

Who is in charge of deciding street names and numbers?

What are the accepted New Zealand standards for street naming and numbering?

Why does my address now appear to be around the corner?

Why were  two letters sent advising my new number?

Why are the names and numbers being changed – they’ve been fine up to now?

Waihi has street names and numbers that are both random and ‘quirky’, such as properties numbered out of sequence and road name changes in the middle of one stretch of road. This is a feature of the unique history of Waihi from when it was established as a mining town in the 1800s. As far as we know it is the only place in New Zealand with such ‘creative’ numbering.

In the modern era where street names and numbers are electronically supplied, this creative approach has increasingly caused problems and concerns for emergency services (particularly for new or temporary staff) and business operators.

In recent times the ongoing problems and concerns have been brought to the attention of the council by emergency services (Fire, Ambulance and Police) and NZ Post. As it is the council’s job to respond to these problems and concerns, we have agreed to address the most problematic ones. 

How many people/properties are affected?

Number of properties affected 23% or 650.

Of the 650 properties affected:

  • one quarter (143) will have their road name and number changed
  • three-quarters (507) will have their number changed.

Approximately 1400 individuals will be affected.

Total number of properties in Waihi – 2872.

What are some of the problems or concerns that have been raised?

They include:

  • not being able to find the right address in an emergency situation – even when GPS technology is used
  • incorrect addressing/delivery of NZ Post items
  • service people needing to drive up and down streets a number of times (wastes money) to find the right address (which is another kind of hazard)
  • visitors getting lost
  • not having capacity in the numbering system for new developments or infill areas (which just makes the existing problem worse).
Where can I find the full list of changes?

View the full list of changes to affected streets , or we can send them to you in hard copy, or you can collect a copy from the Waihi office/library.

What date is the change to take place from?

The changes took effect on 1 March 2016.

When can I use my new address?

You should now be using the new address.

What do these changes mean for the legal definition of my property and who will pay to have the legal definitions changed with my lawyer?

You will not need to make any change to the legal definition.

The legal definition of your property is the information contained on your certificate of title. This includes legal description, land area and often a diagram. This is provided by Land Information New Zealand (LINZ). It does not contain the street address so nothing needs to change from a legal perspective.

However you may want to ensure any insurance company that insures your home and/or contents are advised of the new name or number of your property.

Why does Waihi have to follow the New Zealand standards?

Meeting the New Zealand standard is important because:

  1. emergency services have advised that some street names and numbers in Waihi have the potential to cause confusion for Police, Fire and Ambulance services – particularly when new or temporary staff are assigned to the town
  2. NZ Post and other service agencies recognise that there are inefficiencies caused as a result of the randomness of the current naming and numbering
  3. in some parts of Waihi where new development is occurring there are not enough numbers to go around.
Why didn’t the Council act on this sooner?

The problem is one that has been manageable until recently but in the past 10 years, as technology has become more evident in geographic systems, the problems have increasingly become more evident.

There was/is never a right time to inconvenience people but it is better now than waiting until something goes horribly wrong.

How am I going to let everyone know about my new address?

There are three ways this will occur.

1. Hauraki District Council advising people/businesses/organisations

Major businesses who already service residential and business properties will receive a letter from us advising that some street names and numbers are changing in Waihi.

We will also tell NZ Post and LINZ. Most major businesses get their street addresses from the databases that NZ Post and LINZ maintain.

The companies we will contact are SKY and the main gas, power, insurance and phone companies as well as WINZ and other government departments.

In addition we will notify schools, churches, clubs and community groups in Waihi.

Because we cannot give out personal information to these organisations (for example your name and who lives at a particular property) we will provide the street name/number changes and invite them to review and amend their databases as they think appropriate.


2. You advising people/businesses/organisations that you correspond with

We will send every affected household/property owner a checklist of the sorts of places that you might need to advise about the change of address.

You will be given as many change of address cards as you need to forward on. These are freepost. We will get some to you very soon and you can get more from NZ Post or the Council office. You can send these to all the current people who send things to you by mail.

However if you need assistance with notifying people and businesses about the changes to your personal address, please let us know and we will help you with this.


3. NZ Post sorting the mail through the changes

NZ Post will be at the forefront of the transition in March. As most addressees will stay the same – it is just some numbers and some street names that will change – the NZ Post local posties will handle the redirection.

NZ Post charges a fee for redirections if you decide to take up this additional service. However the cost of this will not be charged to you – we will take care of this.

We want to do everything we can to make this transition as smooth as possible so please do not hesitate to ask us for assistance if you need it.

Please note that the update of the maps and addresses in Google is out of hands and although they have been informed, they are not updating the changes quickly.

Why did the Council choose only to do some of the changes?

Three options were considered:

  1. entire community street naming numbering changes to meet LINZ and other ‘best practice’ guidelines and future-proofing the township
  2.  selection of most needed street naming/numbering changes based to address any current confusions
  3. do nothing.

The Council chose option 2 because this would take care of the majority of problems with the least disruption to residents, businesses and property owners.

What process did the Council follow to get to its decision?

Earlier this year, representatives from each of the three emergency services, NZ Post and courier post, LINZ and the Waihi Ward Councillors met to:

  • specify the extent of the street name and numbering issues
  • identify current or future risk if the issues were to remain.

At this meeting the representatives all agreed that the extent of the issues (inconsistencies, randomness and non-standard application) was widespread and affected almost all of Waihi township.

They also agreed that the current and future risks were both logistical (from ‘annoying’ to ‘very inefficient’) and potentially life threatening (for emergency response).

They noted that naming issues were most evident in ‘main’ street areas. The numbering issues were identified as being particularly bad in ‘infill areas’ and will be compounded as growth occurs.
A report was prepared for the Council summarising these concerns and proposing three options for consideration (see above). The Council chose the option that would cause least disruption while still addressing the main concerns that had been raised.

A follow-up group was established to work on the detail of numbering and name changes to ensure that:

  1. minimal disruption would be caused
  2. numbering would follow the New Zealand standards as (far as practicable)
  3. naming would be relevant and respectful of Waihi’s history.

This group consisted of the Waihi Ward Councillors, Sel Baker and Mary Carmine.

How can I find out more?
  • call our Freephone number: 0800 1MARCH (or 0800 162 724)
Who is in charge of deciding street names and numbers?

Responsibility for the street-naming and numbering in Waihi rests with Hauraki District Council. Land Information New Zealand (LINZ) has created the national standard which provides guidance to all councils for this purpose.

In addition the New Zealand Transport Agency is responsible for the naming and numbering of all State Highways.

Street naming and numbering allows the Council to maintain a comprehensive and accurate address database covering all properties. In turn this enables:

  • emergency services to find a property quickly and effectively
  • post to be delivered efficiently
  • visitors to locate their destination
  • reliable delivery of services and goods by courier companies
  • records of service providers to be kept in an efficient manner eg power companies, broadband
  • companies to accept an address for official purposes eg insurance, credit rating, contract acceptance.
What are the accepted New Zealand standards for street naming and numbering?

Land Information New Zealand provides guidance to be used by councils as defined in the Standard for rural and urban addressing. In summary the three main points are:

  • Addresses should be unique - there are three basic components that make up an address: the number, the road name and the locality.
  • Addresses should be sequential - with odd numbers on the left, even on the right and coming out from a central point in the town. Additional numbers should be reserved for large sites to account for the possibility of infill development.
  • Addresses should be clear and logical - a short cul-de-sac or access way (that has five addresses or less) does not need to be named. It should however be logically numbered to follow the sequence of the main road it is part of.
Why does my address now appear to be around the corner?

Some properties on a corner have had their address re-located to the adjacent street, as the driveway to the property was not actually on the original street.

The ‘rules’ state that the street address must be derived from the street the driveway is located on.

If your street is changing and your letterbox is positioned on the original street, it is not necessary to relocate your letterbox unless you wish to do so.

Why were two letters sent advising my new number?

Hauraki District Council does not hold records of residents of properties, but it does hold the ownership details.

The only way to ensure all residents and owners were advised was to send two letters, one to the resident at the street address, and one to the owner at their postal address.