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Dangerous

Dogs can be classified as Dangerous if they bite or attack and or act in an aggressive manner towards another animal or human. A dangerous dog owner pays 150% of the usual registration fee.

To report an aggressive or dangerous dog contact Hauraki District Council.

Please note that the Council cannot accept anonymous complaints but your identity will remain confidential unless the issue goes to court.

Requirements of Dangerous Dog Classification:

  • Dog must be desexed
  • Dog must be microchipped
  • Dog must be muzzled in all public places
  • Property must be adequately fenced

Menacing

If Council considers that a dog poses a threat to any person, stock, poultry, domestic animal or protected wildlife because of:

  • any observed or reported behaviour of the dog, or
  • any characteristics typically associated with the dogs breed or type,

the Council may classify the dog to be a menacing dog.

The following breeds/cross breeds of dogs are classified as menacing:

  • Brazilian Fila
  • Dogo Argentino
  • Japanese Tosa
  • American Pit Bull Terrier
  • Perro de Presa Canario

Requirements of Menacing Dog Classification:

  • Dog must be desexed
  • Dog must be microchipped
  • Dog must be muzzled in all public places

Legal info you need to know

Control of Dogs

Sections 52, 53 and 54A, Dog Control Act 1996

The owner of a dog must keep the dog under control at all times and, when in a public place with the dog, must use or carry a leash at all times (excluding dog prohibited areas).

A dog will be treated as not being under control – if it is found at large on any land or premises other than a public place or a private way without the consent (express or implied) of the occupier or person in charge of the land or premises; or if it is found at large in any public place or in any private way in contravention of any regulations, bylaw or policy of the Council. You will commit an offence and be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $3000 if you fail to comply with this provision.

Obligations of dog owner

Section 54, Dog Control Act 1996

The owner of a dog must -

Ensure that the dog receives proper care and attention and is supplied with proper and sufficient food, water and shelter; and ensure that the dog receives adequate exercise. You will commit an offence and be liable on conviction to imprisonment for up to 3 months or to a fine not exceeding $3000, if you fail to comply with this provision.

Control of dog on owner’s property

Section 52A, Dog Control Act 1996

The owner of a dog must ensure, when the dog is on land or premises occupied by the owner -
That the dog is under the direct control of a person; or that the dog is confined within the land or premises in such a way that it cannot freely leave the land or premises. You will commit an offence and be liable on conviction to a fine not exceeding $3000 if you fail to comply with this provision. In addition, a dog control officer or dog ranger may seize and impound the dog.